Weather forecast and online webcams > Europe > Sweden

Weather Sweden

Sweden actual weather and longterm weather forecast for Sweden in September and October. You can view actual weather in Sweden thru online Sweden webcams.

Most popular Sweden weather forecast

Bastad

C
32 F
Bastad weather

Abisko

C
32 F
Abisko weather

Stockholm

C
32 F
Stockholm weather

Karlstad

C
32 F
Karlstad weather

Uppsala

C
32 F
Uppsala weather

Halmstad

C
32 F
Halmstad weather

Sundsvall

C
32 F
Sundsvall weather

Boras

C
32 F
Boras weather

Lulea

C
32 F
Lulea weather

Huddinge

C
32 F
Huddinge weather

Harnosand

C
32 F
Harnosand weather

Angelholm

C
32 F
Angelholm weather

Gavle

C
32 F
Gavle weather

Weather forecast in Sweden

Sweden longterm forecast

Most of Sweden has a temperate climate, despite its northern latitude, with four distinct seasons and mild temperatures throughout the year. The country can be divided into three types of climate; the southernmost part has an oceanic climate, the central part has a humid continental climate and the northernmost part has a subarctic climate. However, Sweden is much warmer and drier than other places at a similar latitude, and even somewhat farther south, mainly because of the Gulf Stream. For example, central and southern Sweden has much warmer winters than many parts of Russia, Canada, and the northern United States. Because of its high latitude, the length of daylight varies greatly. North of the Arctic Circle, the sun never sets for part of each summer, and it never rises for part of each winter. In the capital, Stockholm, daylight lasts for more than 18 hours in late June but only around 6 hours in late December. Sweden receives between 1,100 to 1,900 hours of sunshine annually.

Temperatures vary greatly from north to south. Southern and central parts of the country have warm summers and cold winters, with average high temperatures of 20 to 25 C (68 to 77 F) and lows of 12 to 15 C (54 to 59 F) in the summer, and average temperatures of -4 to 2 C (25 to 36 F) in the winter, while the northern part of the country has shorter, cooler summers and longer, colder and snowier winters, with temperatures that often drop below freezing from September through May. The highest temperature ever recorded in Sweden was 38 C (100 F) in Målilla in 1947, while the coldest temperature ever recorded was −52.6 C (−62.7 F) in Vuoggatjålme in 1966.

On average, most of Sweden receives between 500 and 800 mm (20 and 31 in) of precipitation each year, making it considerably drier than the global average. The southwestern part of the country receives more precipitation, between 1000 and 1200 mm (39 and 47 in), and some mountain areas in the north are estimated to receive up to 2000 mm (79 in). Despite northerly locations, southern and central Sweden may have almost no snow in some winters.

source: wikipedia / Sweden weather